How to Talk to Your Relatives About Climate Change (And Maybe Change Their Minds)

Mapping Global Temperature Changes: Every Year From 1850 to 2016

These maps depict global temperature change for the past 166 years.

Image courtesy of Ed Hawkins

Maybe more important than the science or data, which has left many people unmoved, is the willingness to share your personal experience of climate change. For example, climate change knocked at my door in the middle of the night last month. I was home alone with my 5-year-old son.  There was so much smoke, it got in through closed windows and woke us up.  A fire was raging in the Napa Valley, and for the next five days, there was no view out our windows, just gray.  All the kids at school were wearing masks.  Everyone felt sick from the bad air, and everyone knew someone who had been evacuated. We were addicted to news of the fire, which were uncontainable for days because it was too hot and dry for the time of year.  There was nothing to do but hope for a merciful change in the weather, which didn’t come until after 43 people had died and 8,400 structures had burned. When we talk about the way climate change is getting real, it’s hard to have a superficial, partisan debate.

And then there’s the hopeful news about clean energy.  That’s your ace card.  A few compelling facts to put in your pocket:

  • The cost to install solar has dropped by more than 70 percent since 2010 in the U.S.
  • In fact, solar is on track to become the world’s cheapest source of power on an unsubsidized basis.
  • With no fuel cost and lower operating and maintenance costs, solar and especially wind are outcompeting even the most efficient new gas plants in states like Texas.
  • Renewable energy is creating jobs 12 times faster than the rest of the economy in the U.S.
  • While solar accounted for only 1 percent of our power mix in 2016, it already employs more people than the entire coal industry.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, solar installer is the fastest-growing occupation in the U.S., with wind technician coming in at a close second.

Why is all of this such good news? Clean energy is a boon to the economy no matter what your views on climate are. Right now, China is positioning itself to dominate the new energy economy, while the U.S. is doubling down on the fossil economy of the past. But there is still time for the U.S. to lead, if we make clean energy a top-line, bipartisan issue in this country.

For those who feel too defeated by the scale of climate change to engage, it’s worth underscoring that we are witnessing an energy revolution that can secure the future if we force progress fast enough. Burning fossil fuels accounts for roughly three-quarters of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, along with much of the worst air and water pollution in this country. Transitioning from fossil fuels to clean energy is the most important thing we can do to limit climate change. Clean energy also happens to be a powerful engine for health, wealth and democracy given the outsize contribution of fossil fuel interests to our money-in-politics problem. 

The Trump administration and the fossil fuels industry is actively working against clean energy progress, but we have the tools, the courts, and the people power to keep advancing clean power in states and cities. If you want to talk about how we keep making progress over the next three years, a few concrete examples are written up here and here and here. The way that people are showing up, around the country, to transform our energy system is a source of hope and cheer for me and my colleagues at Earthjustice. Help us spread the word!

Source: https://earthjustice.org/blog/2017-november/how-to-talk-to-that-one-relative-about-climate-change-without-ruining-your-holiday-meal