Special Episode on Climate Disruption

MP3 Link

This week on CounterSpin: As Americans celebrate a fairly tale about the relationship between Native Americans and settlers, actual Native Americans are mourning the pollution of more of their land, and lives, by fossil fuels. The November 16 spill of more than 200,000 gallons of oil from the Keystone pipeline occurred adjacent to the South Dakota reservation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribe. The inevitability of such spills is, of course, only one of many reasons millions of people resist pipelines.

Intercept footage of riot police at DAPL protest

(image: The Intercept)

Last August, CounterSpin heard from Kandi Mossett, Native energy and climate campaign organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network, about the peaceful protest against the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota. We revisit that conversation this week.

Climate disruption is many stories—not just big messes like oil spills, but some maybe subtler but no less meaningful impacts, like birds disappearing from your backyard. We talked about some of the less-discussed changes last summer with environmental writer Dan Zukowski. We’ll hear some of that too.

People's Climate March, New York City, 2014 (cc photo: South Bend Voice)

(cc photo: South Bend Voice)

There’s no scientific controversy that we have to keep fossil fuels in the ground. The fight is political. InsideClimate News reporter Marianne Lavelle spoke with us early in the Trump administration about how the White House’s plans are setting us back.

And finally, why, in 2017, do corporate media insist on making ideological room for climate change denialists and go-slowers, even as working journalists report the utterly undeniable? We spoke with FAIR’s own editor Jim Naureckas about that.

Climate disruption—and corporate media’s compromised and inadequate response, this week on Counterspin.

Source: http://fair.org/home/special-episode-on-climate-disruption/